New ME/CFS study.


A13
6mo ago by MyPatientMatch User

Full text. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213158218301347

Looks like the brain is recruiting more regions to accomplish tasks. Takes longer to do them. New testing called BOLD.
Title: Brain function characteristics of chronic fatigue syndrome: A task fMRI study.

"This study investigated the temporal complexity of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) changes in response to the Stroop task in CFS patients.

" The Stroop task was selected becausee of the attention and concentration difficulties frequently reported by CFS patients.

"The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores from the SF-36 survey (Ware et al., 1995) in CFS were significantly lower than those in NCs [normal controls] (Table 1). In the Stroop task the CFS patients scored a slightly lower accuracy and showed less Stroop effect than NCs, but the difference was not significant. However, the RT [response time];of CFS patients was significantly longer than NCs (Table 1).

CFS patients recruit larger BOLD activation areas for the Stroop task.
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"BOLD signal complexities in CFS are lower in ten activated regions.The BOLD signal complexity explains more than 40% of variance in the health score across all subjects.

"43 CFS patients (47.4 11.8 yrs) and 26 normal controls (NCs, 43.4 13.9 yrs) were included in this study. ....Their Stroop colour-word task performance was measured by accuracy and response time (RT).... The temporal complexity of the BOLD responses, a measure of information capacity and thus adaptability to a challenging environment, in each activated region was measured by sample entropy (SampEn).

"The CFS patients showed significantly longer RTs [response time] than the NCs [normal controls](P < 0.05) but no significant difference in accuracy. One sample t-tests for the two groups (Family wise error adjusted PFWE < 0.05) showed more BOLD activation regions in the CFS, although a two sample group comparison did not show significant difference. BOLD SampEns in ten regions were significantly lower (FDR-q < 0.05) in CFS patients. BOLD SampEns in 15 regions were significantly associated with PCS (FDR-q < 0.05) and in 9 regions were associated with MCS (FDR-q < 0.05) across all subjects. SampEn of the BOLD signal in the medioventral occipital cortex could explain 40% and 31% of the variance in the SF-36 PCS and MCS scores, and those in the precentral gyrus could explain an additional 16% and 7% across all subjects.

"This is the first study to investigate BOLD signal SampEn in response to tasks in CFS. The results suggest the brain responds differently to a cognitive challenge in patients with CFS, with recruitment of wider regions to compensate for lower information capacity.

"The sample entropy (a measure of amount of information encoded in a temporal signal) of BOLD response to Stroop tasks in seven areas are significantly lower in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and significantly correlated health scores across all subjects, suggesting that the brain operates differently in CFS patients."

[As far as I went ]

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A13
6mo ago by MyPatientMatch User

Thank you Blank for posting this. Its afternoon and my brain barely functions so it was hard understanding something I would normally (well, years ago!) have no problem with, but I got the gist. Its great to keep seeing objective evidence of our physical and cognitive problems.

Cognitive impairment is the most disabling and demoralizing aspect of this illness for me.

A13
6mo ago by MyPatientMatch User

I can understand it would hit you in the emotions.
I was thinking (as I probably always will now) that none the most severely affected patients could even have made it to study participation, so results are not absolute for everyone.

You didn't say anything!

A13
6mo ago by MyPatientMatch User
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A13
6mo ago by MyPatientMatch User

And apparently it requires the correct conditions for the brain to get its act together!
One thing that used to trip up my sleep schedule up was that my brain worked best late-night/middle-of-the-night. And night after night I would wallow in the joy of a sharper brain during that time.

A13
6mo ago by MyPatientMatch User
(hidden by user)

You didn't say anything!

You didn't say anything!